Thursday, September 10, 2009

MUST Tour in These PLaCeS




Most Interesting Places in the World

Chobe National Park, Botswana

I've only spent one day in Botswana, but that was an exciting visit to the Chobe National Park on a day trip from our base on the Zambian side of Victoria Falls. The park is named after the Chobe River on the country's northern boundary, but it covers a massive 11,700 sq km of dusty plains, woodland, savanna and forested floodplain. It is home to an exciting variety of large mammals and over 450 bird species and is renowned for having the highest concentration of elephants in Africa with anything like an amazing 60,000-80,000.
The birds we spotted included the long-legged African jacana, the long-necked African darter, the long-legged and long-necked white egret, the wire-tailed swallow, bee eaters, a goliath heron, male and female fish eagles, lots of blacksmith plovers, a yellow-billed stork, and open-billed storks flying in formation. The animals we saw included lots of male impalas, red waterbucks - noted for the circle on their rump - and red lechwe (both types of antelope), pukus and a kudo (another two types of antelope), some buffalo, a water lizard, a warthog and its baby, a large female crocodile guarding its eggs, and

group of hippos on land. And, of course, lots of elephants ...

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam


The night before my visit to Ha Long Bay was spent in a hospital in the city of Hai Phong nursing a black eye and other bruising after passing out in my hotel. I discharged myself as soon as dawn broke and before being checked by a doctor because I had no intention of missing the group's tour of Ha Long Bay.
The name Ha Long means 'descending dragon' and the legend is that the bay was cut from the rocks as an enormous beast thrashed its way to the depths. It covers around 1,500 square metres with 2,969 rocky limestone islands (980 of them with names and 20 of them inhabited). The bay in the Gulf of Tonkin is now a UNESCO World Heritage site. Some 400 tourist boats plough the waters but, so immense is the bay, that one's own trip still feels very personal. The weather that morning was quite misty, but the experience was nevertheless magical and mysterious.

Iguassu Falls, Brazil/Argentina


During a three-week trip to South America in 2001, Vee and I spent about 24 hours at the sensational Iguassu Falls. Iguassu means Great Waters in Guaraní (which is the language spoken by many in Paraguay). After 800 miles gathering anger across Brazil, the Falls are located at conjunction of Brazil (north), Argentina (south) and Paraguay (east), with the actual cataracts shared by Brazil and Argentina.
Vee and I had both seen Niagara Falls twice and had been incredibly impressed, but Iguassu Falls are just so much more awe-inspiring. First, they are quite simply bigger, being twice as wide and taller by 20 metres. They are more than 2 km across and more than 70 metres high with a total of 275 individual cataracts. Second, the area is not just about the water - impressive though that is - it is a sub-tropical reservoir of an amazing diversity of fauna and flora. There are about 350 types of birds and 2,000 species of plants in the National Park. Thirdly - and wonderfully for tourists - there is an incredible system of walkways thaDown at the river, we donned bright orange life jackets and boarded a bi-motor rubber dinghy for a ride up to the Falls themselves. This is not the experience at Niagara Falls where around a hundred people board the "Maid of the Mist" wearing plastic macs because of the spray. This is much more personal - about 20 people speed into the very heart of the Falls and are totally drenched.
After staying overnight on the Brazilian side of the Falls, next morning we drove over the bridge into Argentina, a very easy and informal process. As on the Brazilian side, the Argentinean side has a system of walkways that give visitors wonderful views. There is a lower walkway of 1,100 km and a higher walkway of 1,000 km.
The Argentinean walkways, though, are made of metal grills and run much closer to the water. Down every slope, round every corner, and up every ramp we witnessed another glorious view, another fascinating vista, another inspiring scene, so we took photographs endlessly. It was pointed out to us where Roland Joffé did his location shooting for the film . I could hear in my head the film's haunting theme "On Earth As It Is In Heaven" written by Ennio Morricone. On the Argentinean side, it is easier to see a variety of wildlife from the walkways and we observed a toucan with a magnificently coloured beak, a lizard and lots of swifts, jays, vultures and other birds.
The highlight of the morning in Argentina, though, was the visit to the most violent and ome of the Falls' 275 cataracts known as Garganta del Diablo (Devil's Throat). This involves a short drive round to the edge of the Falls, a short boat ride out to a flimsy bridge, and then a precarious walk the length of the bridge (it was swept away in the floods of 1983 and 1992). At this point, one is standing on a platform looking into the very throat of the Devil and the power of the water is mesmerising. One's ears are pounded by the roar of the cataract and one's eyes are caught by the swifts darting into the spray.t enables one to feel a very part of the Falls and almost enter into them. From this network of concrete walkways, we had stunning views of the Falls and many opportunities to see exotically-decorated butterflies. The final section of these walkways on the Brazilian side of the Falls takes one above some of the water flows which is very wet and very exciting. Everywhere there were bright rainbows that seemed to follow you as you moved.

Los Angles

The Los Angeles coastal area was first settled by the Tongva and Chumash Native American tribes thousands of years ago.

The first Europeans arrived in 1542 in an expedition organized by the viceroy of New Spain and commanded by Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, a Portuguese-born explorer who claimed the area of southern California for the Spanish Empire. However, he continued with his voyage up the coast and did not establish a settlement.


The next contact would not come until 227 years later, when Gaspar de Portola, along with Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi, reached the present site of Los Angeles on August 2, 1769. Crespí noted that the site had the potential to be developed into a large settlement.
In 1771, Franciscan friar Junípero Serra built the Mission San Gabriel Arcangel near Whittier Narrows, in what is now called San Gabriel Valley. In 1777, the new governor of California, Felipe de Neve, recommended to Antonio María de Bucareli y Ursua, viceroy of New Spain, that the site noted by Juan Crespí be developed into a pueblo. The town was officially founded on September 4, 1781, by a group of forty-four settlers known as "Los Pobladores". Tradition has it that on this day they were escorted by four Spanish colonial soldiers, two priests from the Mission and Governor de Neve. The town was named El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los angeles del Rio de Porciuncula (The Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels on the Porciúncula River). These pueblo settlers came from the common Hispanic culture that had emerged in northern Mexico among a racially mixed society. Two-thirds of the settlers were mestizo or mulatto, and therefore, had African and Indian ancestry. More importantly, they were intermarrying. The settlement remained a small ranch town for decades, but by 1820 the population had increased to about 650 residents. Today, the pueblo is commemorated in the historic district of Los Angeles Pueblo Plaza and Olvera Street, the oldest part of Los Angeles
.

Culture
The people of Los Angeles are known as Angelenos.Nighttime hot spots include

places such as Downtown Los Angeles, Silver Lake, Hollywood, and West Hollywood, which is the home of the world-famous Sunset Strip.
Some well-known shopping areas are the Hollywood and Highland complex, the Beverly Center, Melrose Avenue, Robertson Boulevard, Rodeo Drive, Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, The Grove, Westside Pavilion, Westfield Century City, The Promenade at Howard Hughes Center and Venice Boardwalk.

Religion

Built in 1956, the Los Angeles California Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the second largest Mormon temple in the world
The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Los Angeles leads the largest archdioces. in the country. Cardinal Roger Mahony oversaw construction of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, completed in 2002 at the north end of downtown. Construction of the cathedral marked a coming of age of the Catholic, heavily Latino community. There are numerous Catholic churches and parishes throughout the city.
The Los Angeles California Temple, the second largest temple operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is on Santa Monica Boulevard in the Westwood district of Los Angeles. Dedicated in 1956, it was the first Mormon temple built in California and it was the largest in the world when completed. The grounds includes a visitors' center open to the public, the Los Angeles Regional Family History Center, also open to the public, and the headquarters for the Los Angeles mission.
With 621,000 Jews in the metropolitan area (490,000 in city proper), the region has the second largest population of Jews in the United States. Many synagogues of the Reform, Conservative, Orthodox, and Reconstructionist movements can be found throughout the city. Most are located in the San Fernando Valley and West Los Angeles. The area in West Los Angeles around Fairfax and Pico Boulevards contains a large number of Orthodox Jews. The Breed Street Shul in East Los Angeles, built in 1923, was the largest synagogue west of Chicago in its early decades. (It is no longer a sacred space and is being converted to a museum and community center.) The Kabbalah Centre, devoted to one line of Jewish mysticism, is also in the city.


MUST Tour in These PLaCeS



Most Interesting Places in the World

Chobe National Park, Botswana

I've only spent one day in Botswana, but that was an exciting visit to the Chobe National Park on a day trip from our base on the Zambian side of Victoria Falls. The park is named after the Chobe River on the country's northern boundary, but it covers a massive 11,700 sq km of dusty plains, woodland, savanna and forested floodplain. It is home to an exciting variety of large mammals and over 450 bird species and is renowned for having the highest concentration of elephants in Africa with anything like an amazing 60,000-80,000.
The birds we spotted included the long-legged African jacana, the long-necked African darter, the long-legged and long-necked white egret, the wire-tailed swallow, bee eaters, a goliath heron, male and female fish eagles, lots of blacksmith plovers, a yellow-billed stork, and open-billed storks flying in formation. The animals we saw included lots of male impalas, red waterbucks - noted for the circle on their rump - and red lechwe (both types of antelope), pukus and a kudo (another two types of antelope), some buffalo, a water lizard, a warthog and its baby, a large female crocodile guarding its eggs, and

group of hippos on land. And, of course, lots of elephants ...

Ha Long Bay, Vietnam


The night before my visit to Ha Long Bay was spent in a hospital in the city of Hai Phong nursing a black eye and other bruising after passing out in my hotel. I discharged myself as soon as dawn broke and before being checked by a doctor because I had no intention of missing the group's tour of Ha Long Bay.
The name Ha Long means 'descending dragon' and the legend is that the bay was cut from the rocks as an enormous beast thrashed its way to the depths. It covers around 1,500 square metres with 2,969 rocky limestone islands (980 of them with names and 2
0 of them inhabited). The bay in the Gulf of Tonkin is now a UNESCO World Heritage site. Some 400 tourist boats plough the waters but, so immense is the bay, that one's own trip still feels very personal. The weather that morning was quite misty, but the experience was nevertheless magical and mysterious.

Iguassu Falls, Brazil/Argentina


During a three-week trip to South America in 2001, Vee and I spent about 24 hours at the sensational Iguassu Falls. Iguassu means Great Waters in Guaraní (which is the language spoken by many in Paraguay). After 800 miles gathering anger across Brazil, the Falls are located at conjunction of Brazil (north), Argentina (south) and Paraguay (east), with the actual cataracts shared by Brazil and Argentina.
Vee and I had both seen Niagara Falls twice and had been incredibly impressed, but Iguassu Falls are just so much more awe-inspiring. First, they are quite simply bigger, being twice as wide and taller by 20 metres. They are more than 2 km across and more than 70 metres high with a total of 275 individual cataracts. Second, the area is not just about the water - impressive though that is - it is a sub-tropical reservoir of an amazing diversity of fauna and flora. There are about 350 types of birds and 2,000 species of plants in the National Park. Thirdly - and wonderfully for tourists - there is an incredible system of walkways thaDown at the river, we donned bright orange life jackets and boarded a bi-motor rubber dinghy for a ride up to the Falls themselves. This is not the experience at Niagara Falls where around a hundred people board the "Maid of the Mist" wearing plastic macs because of the spray. This is much more personal - about 20 people speed into the very heart of the Falls and are totally drenched.
After staying overnight on the Brazilian side of the Falls, next morning we drove over the bridge into Argentina, a very easy and informal process. As on the Brazilian side, the Argentinean side has a system of walkways that give visitors wonderful views. There is a lower walkway of 1,100 km and a higher walkway of 1,000 km.
The Argentinean walkways, though, are made of metal grills and run much closer to the water. Down every slope, round every corner, and up every ramp we witnessed another glorious view, another fascinating vista, another inspiring scene, so we took photographs endlessly. It was pointed out to us where Roland Joffé did his location shooting for the film . I could hear in my head the film's haunting theme "On Earth As It Is In Heaven" written by Ennio Morricone. On the Argentinean side, it is easier to see a variety of wildlife from the walkways and we observed a toucan with a magnificently coloured beak, a lizard and lots of swifts, jays, vultures and other birds.
The highlight of the morning in Argentina, though, was the visit to the most violent and fearsome of the Falls' 275 cataracts known as Garganta del Diablo (Devil's Throat). This involves a short drive round to the edge of the Falls, a short boat ride out to a flimsy bridge, and then a precarious walk the length of the bridge (it was swept away in the floods of 1983 and 1992). At this point, one is standing on a platform looking into the very throat of the Devil and the power of the water is mesmerising. One's ears are pounded by the roar of the cataract and one's eyes are caught by the swifts darting into the spray.t enables one to feel a very part of the Falls and almost enter into them. From this network of concrete walkways, we had stunning views of the Falls and many opportunities to see exotically-decorated butterflies. The final section of these walkways on the Brazilian side of the Falls takes one above some of the water flows which is very wet and very exciting. Everywhere there were bright rainbows that seemed to follow you as you moved.

Los Angles

The Los Angeles coastal area was first settled by the Tongva and Chumash Native American tribes thousands of years ago.

The first Europeans arrived in 1542 in an expedition organized by the viceroy of New Spain and commanded by Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, a Portuguese-born explorer who claimed the area of southern California for the Spanish Empire. However, he continued with his voyage up the coast and did not establish a settlement.


The next contact would not come until 227 years later, when Gaspar de Portola, along with Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi, reached the present site of Los Angeles on August 2, 1769. Crespí noted that the site had the potential to be developed into a large settlement.
In 1771, Franciscan friar Junípero Serra built the Mission San Gabriel Arcangel near Whittier Narrows, in what is now called San Gabriel Valley. In 1777, the new governor of California, Felipe de Neve, recommended to Antonio María de Bucareli y Ursua, viceroy of New Spain, that the site noted by Juan Crespí be developed into a pueblo. The town was officially founded on September 4, 1781, by a group of forty-four settlers known as "Los Pobladores". Tradition has it that on this day they were escorted by four Spanish colonial soldiers, two priests from the Mission and Governor de Neve. The town was named El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los angeles del Rio de Porciuncula (The Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels on the Porciúncula River). These pueblo settlers came from the common Hispanic culture that had emerged in northern Mexico among a racially mixed society. Two-thirds of the settlers were mestizo or mulatto, and therefore, had African and Indian ancestry. More importantly, they were intermarrying. The settlement remained a small ranch town for decades, but by 1820 the population had increased to about 650 residents. Today, the pueblo is commemorated in the historic district of Los Angeles Pueblo Plaza and Olvera Street, the oldest part of Los Angeles
.

Culture
The people of Los Angeles are known as Angelenos.Nighttime hot spots include

places such as Downtown Los Angeles, Silver Lake, Hollywood, and West Hollywood, which is the home of the world-famous Sunset Strip.
Some well-known shopping areas are the Hollywood and Highland complex, the Beverly Center, Melrose Avenue, Robertson Boulevard, Rodeo Drive, Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, The Grove, Westside Pavilion, Westfield Century City, The Promenade at Howard Hughes Center and Venice Boardwalk.

Religion

Built in 1956, the Los Angeles California Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the second largest Mormon temple in the world
The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Los Angeles leads the largest archdioces. in the country. Cardinal Roger Mahony oversaw construction of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, completed in 2002 at the north end of downtown. Construction of the cathedral marked a coming of age of the Catholic, heavily Latino community. There are numerous Catholic churches and parishes throughout the city.
The Los Angeles California Temple, the second largest temple operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is on Santa Monica Boulevard in the Westwood district of Los Angeles. Dedicated in 1956, it was the first Mormon temple built in California and it was the largest in the world when completed. The grounds includes a visitors' center open to the public, the Los Angeles Regional Family History Center, also open to the public, and the headquarters for the Los Angeles mission.
With 621,000 Jews in the metropolitan area (490,000 in city proper), the region has the second largest population of Jews in the United States. Many synagogues of the Reform, Conservative, Orthodox, and Reconstructionist movements can be found throughout the city. Most are located in the San Fernando Valley and West Los Angeles. The area in West Los Angeles around Fairfax and Pico Boulevards contains a large number of Orthodox Jews. The Breed Street Shul in East Los Angeles, built in 1923, was the largest synagogue west of Chicago in its early decades. (It is no longer a sacred space and is being converted to a museum and community center.) The Kabbalah Centre, devoted to one line of Jewish mysticism, is also in the city.

Karachi



Karachi is the cosmopolitan city of Pakistan. The capital of the Sind Province, Karachi has come a long way from an obscure fishing village in the 18th century to a leading city bubbling with trade and commerce. Once the capital of Pakistan, Karachi today is one of the most populous cities in Pakistan. A classic mix of old and new, Karachi is wonderful tourist destination.
For a tourist traveling to Karachi, the port city is a bouquet of varying tourist sights and activities. If the city offers a wonderful opportunity for water sports, there are other places that are a delight to experience. Karachi is one of the finest cities when it comes to infrastructure. Karachi has a number of high-end hotels, wonderful restaurants and bustling markets to keep a tourist busy. The city has an international airport, which links the city with rest of the world. Karachi is often called the gateway to Pakistan.
Most tourists to the city start their tour to Karachi with a visit to Quaid-I-Azam Mausoleum-the monument dedicated to the founder of Pakistan, Mohammed Ali Jinnah. But it's entirely up to you, the way you like your tour to start. You can visit the exciting markets that line the streets of Karachi. Hi-tech electronic shops are something that is hard to miss when strolling through the bazaars of Karachi.
The white-marbled Defence Housing Society Mosque makes its presence felt, when it comes to architectural masterpieces in Karachi. The single dome of the mosque is probably the largest in the world. Wazir Mansion is another wonderful place that you can visit in Karachi .
goOther places of tourist interest in Karachi include the St. Andrew's Church and the Holy Trinity Cathedral. A tour of the city zoo is another fun option in the port city. Those interested in beach activities can head to Clifton Beach and Manora Island.
Located on the east of the Arabian Sea, Karachi offers some exciting water sports options. You can enjoy water skiing, yachting and cruising on your tour to Karachi.



Lahore:

In the past, Lahore was the melting pot of different culture, art and craft. Centuries later, not much has changed. The second largest city in Pakistan, Lahore is the educational, cultural and artistic capital of Pakistan. Once the capital of the Mughal Empire, Lahore bears the stamp of the Mughal architecture.
According to mythology Lahore traces its origin to the period of the Ramayana and to Loe, the son of Lord Rama, who believed to have founded the city, but history, traces the past of Lahore from the 8th century AD onwards. Lahore was under the rule of the Hindu ruler Lalitiditya in the 8th century, before the advent of the Muslim in the 11th century. In the 13th century, Lahore was completely destroyed when it became the target of Mongolian warriors, who were led by Genghis Khan. Lahore was at its peak during the Mughal rule in the medieval times and later; the city became an important political center during the fight for independence against the British.
Lahore opens vistas of cultural, architectural and scenic beauty to a traveler. There is so much to see and enjoy in Lahore that if you are the one who believes in touch and go, you may not be able to enjoy Lahore completely. Lahore is the place that welcomes you with its various historic sights, cultural centres, vibrant markets and great hospitality.
Lahore is the capital of the Punjab province and is home to some wonderful monuments. Most popular of them all is the Royal Fort or Shahi Quila that dates back to 1556 AD. The fort was built by the Mughal emperor Akabar and houses some fine buildings that include Diwan-e-Aam, Moti Masjid, Khwahbag-e-Jahangir and Diwan-e-Khas. The Sheesh Mahal or the Palace of Mirrors is something that you should not miss on your visit to the Royal Fort.
The Imperial or the Badshahi Mosque is another marvel of architecture. The mosque was built by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb in 1647. Beautifully built in red stone, the Badshahi Mosque is the second largest mosque in Pakistan. Wazir Khan's Mosqueis another beautiful mosque in Lahore that you can visit. This mosque was built in 1634 by Wazir Khan.
The Mughals' gift to Lahore-the Shalimar Gardens is an exciting place to visit. Just five kilometres from the old city the gardens make a wonderful tourist spot for tourists to Pakistan. Built by the Mughal ruler Shah Jehan in 1642, the gardens reflect the typical Mughal style layout.
The other places that you can include in your itinerary include the Mall, Lahore Museum, Kim's Gun and the Minar-I-Pakistan. Aitchison College, that was once the studying place of Imran Khan is another beautiful spot that you check out. A walk through the bazaars in Lahore is a must on your tour to Lahore. No tour to Lahore is complete with enjoying the flavors of the local cuisine.


Friday, June 12, 2009



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Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Jhang

The first city of Jhang was built in 1288 by Rai Sial with the advice of Hazrat Shah Jalal Bukhari (his peer). The first ruler of Jhang was Mal Khan in 1462. Sial tribe ruled this city for 360 years and the last ruler of the Sial Tribe was Ahmad Khan from 1812 to 1822 and then Sikh took over. And from the rule of the Sikh, Jhang was taken over by the British.
Jhang is more famous for its men than for its products. The Jhangvi men are hardy peasants, healthy, tall, strong and of wheatish complexion. The dress of the locals comprises a Majhla, a Kurta or Chola, a Chadar and a Turban or Pugri. It is completed by shoes, Chappli or Kherri. The women are fair complexioned, cypress statured and good looking. The women also wear Majhla (Lungi) besides Chola and Dopatta but many women wear Shalwar Qameez. The people live in the plains and therefore are plain and straight-forward people - broad minded, hospitable and progressive. Jhang is the centre of a purely agricultural based feudalistic society. Agriculture is the chief source of income and employment in Jhang. About 85% of the Jhang's cultivable land is irrigated. Wheat and cotton are the principal crops. Other crops grown include rice, sugarcane, corn (maize), oilseeds, fruits, and vegetables. Livestock and poultry are also raised in large numbers in district Jhang.
Jhang is characterised by extreme climate - the temperature is generally hot, with marked variations between summer and winter. In the plain the mean June temperature is 95 F (35 C), while the mean January temperature is 55 F (12 C). The monsoon reaches the area exhausted and therefore the rainfall is quite meagre. There is also occasional rain during the winters. The average annual rainfall is 7-10 inches (180 mm) in district Jhang. Occasionally there are dust storms. The summer may be somehow discomforting, but for the greater part of the year the climate is ideal and invigorating. The best part of the year is from the middle of February to the middle of April, which is the spring in the Jhang. It is neither cold nor hot but simply pleasant and enjoyable. The entire district-side becomes a vast stretch of greenery. The mustard fields are covered with yellow flowers, trees put on new leaves, fruits begin to blossom and there are flowers every where. This is also the time for several spring festivals, including Jhang Committee Show.
Jhang is connected by road or railway to some main cities of the country, but not any air service is provided by government yet.

Monday, May 25, 2009

Horrer Pictures











Funny Pictures
































































Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Why Beauty...?

Everyone wants to become gorgeous, goodlooking and attractive and no one can ignore this fact.Especially the females are more sensitive than males.However males also want their personality as handsome as the celebrities have. But why everyone is not so beautiful and charming?Here I have solution for every thing, the beauty, the fitness, the smartness and.... so must visit: http://www.beautynsmartness.blogspot.com/

Monday, May 11, 2009

President of Pakistan

Do not hesitate to stop laughing........

Revloution in Parvez Musharraf
Pervez Musharraf (born 11 August 1943 is a former President of Pakistan and a former Chief of Army Staff of the Pakistan Army.
He took power on 12 October 1999, ousting Nawaz Sharif, the elected Prime Minister, by effecting a military coup d'état. He dismissed the national and provincial legislative assemblies, assumed the title of Chief Executive and became Pakistan's de facto head of government, thereby becoming the fourth Army chief of Pakistan to have assumed executive control. Later, in 2001, Musharraf appointed himself to the office of President. After Musharraf announced his intention to combat extremists, Western countries (including the United States and the United Kingdom) switched from a policy of sanctions to active support through military and monetary aid.
On 3 November 2007, only days before a panel of the Supreme Court of Pakistan was to decide on a petition challenging the constitutional validity of his re-election as president in the controversial October 2007 elections, he, as Chief of Army Staff, suspended the constitution, jailed several justices and lawyers of the supreme court including Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, ordered the arrest of political dissidents and human rights activists, and shut down all private television channels. On 3 November 2007, Musharraf declared a state of emergency in Pakistan which lasted until 15 December 2007. During this time, the constitution of the country was suspended.
On 24 November 2007, the Pakistan Election Commission confirmed his re-election as President.
On 18 August 2008, Pervez Musharraf resigned from the post of President under impeachment pressure from the coalition government. Consequently, his website was removed since he was no longer President. He was succeeded on 6 September 2008 by Asif Ali Zardari, duly elected as Pakistan's 11th President since 1956.

Indo-Pakistani wars:
Musharraf participated in the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965 as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 16 (SP) Field Artillery Regiment. His regiment saw action as part of the First Armoured Division’s offensive in the Khemkaran sector; as part of a major offensive against the Indian Army, the Pakistani army advanced 15 miles (24 km) into India and it was in the town of Khem Karan that Musharraf wrote his first letter to his mother during the war "proudly saying that I was writing from India". However, despite the initial success and even though possessing a quantitative advantage and significant superiority in armour, the 1st armoured division (labelled "Pride of the Pakistan Army") suffered a "crushing defeat" at Khemkaran, which became known as "Patton Nagar" or graveyard of Pakistani tanks. By all accounts the vital advance failed at the Battle of Asal Uttar, as Pakistan lost a golden opportunity to make major strategic gains; this was a turning point in the war. His regiment was later moved to the Lahore front, which was threatened by the Indian Army. According to Musharraf, "Having stabilized the Lahore front, we were ordered to move again to the Sialkot front. This was where the famous tank battles of Chawinda were fought. At the end of the war this sector was to become a graveyard of Indian tanks.". During the war Musharraf was noted for sticking to his post under shellfire. Towards the end of the war an Indian shell hit one of the artillery guns of Musharraf's unit and set it on fire. According to Musharraf, whilst everyone else took cover, he, followed by a soldier, "dashed to the blazing gun" and removed the "hot shells" one by one and "threw them to safety on the ground". For this he received an award for gallantry and was promoted to the rank of captain. Later, in the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, he served as a Company Commander in the Special Service Group (SSG) Commando Battalion. Originally scheduled to be flown to East Pakistan along with other SSG troops, he was redeployed in Punjab as war broke out and all flights over India were cancelled. He later admitted that he "broke down and wept" when he heard the "disgusting" news of Pakistan's unconditional surrender to India. Later he commanded regiments of artillery, an Artillery Brigade and then an infantry division. In September 1987, he was instrumental in giving orders to a newly formed SSG at Khapalu base (Kashmir), which launched an assault and successfully captured two intermediate posts, Bilafond La in Siachen Glacier, before being pushed back
On promotion to the rank of Major General on 15 January 1991, he was assigned the command of an infantry Division. Later, on promotion to Lieutenant General on 21 October 1995 he took over command of 1 Corps, the elite strike corps. In 1998, following the resignation of General Jehangir Karamat, he was personally promoted over other senior officers by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and took over as the Army Chief of Staff and Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee.






Role in Kargil Conflict:
Kargil War
From May to July 1999, Pakistan and India were involved in the Kargil Conflict, an armed conflict between the two countries in the Kargil district of Kashmir. It was planned and executed during General Musharraf's term as the Pakistani Army Chief of Staff under Prime Minister Sharif.
Sharif has claimed that Musharraf was solely responsible for the Kargil attacks. On the other hand, Musharraf claims that the decision was made by Sharif, who was under United States pressure. Ex-CENTCOM Commander Anthony Zinni, and Sharif, have stated that Musharraf requested that the Prime Minister withdraw Pakistani troops from Kashmir.
Casualties on both sides had been particularly heavy in Kargil. Musharraf had good relations with Jehangir Karamat from whom he took over the command. Soon after the coup, one of the first to be appointed as minister was journalist Maleeha Lodhi who was close to Jehangir Karamat. Also recruited was Shaukat Aziz (who served as the country's Prime Minister later) who volunteered to improve the economy. Western banks rescheduled Pakistani loans, which had been subjected to economic sanctions since Pakistan conducted atomic testing.
Pervez Musharraf resigned from the Army on 28 November 2007 in an attempt to regularize his position as President
After Presidentship:
After doing Operations on Lal Masjid,Bajoor and other wrong and blunder steps his Future will be Insha-Allah.............

His life will not be stable either he will be hawker or Madari, sometimes he will become a little cook(Insha-Allah).















Must post comments of your former president

Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Scotland

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain, it shares a border with England to the south and is bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the southwest. In addition to the mainland, Scotland consists of over 790 islands including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.
Edinburgh, the country's capital and second largest city, is one of Europe's largest financial centres. Edinburgh was the hub of the Scottish Enlightenment of the 18th century, which transformed Scotland into one of the commercial, intellectual and industrial powerhouses of Europe. Glasgow, Scotland's largest city, was once one of the world's leading industrial cities and now lies at the centre of the Greater Glasgow conurbation. Scottish waters consist of a large sector of the North Atlantic and the North Sea, containing the largest oil reserves in the European Union.

Monday, April 27, 2009


Thursday, April 23, 2009

Switzerland:

Switzerland is a beautiful alpine country in central Europe.

The safety, security, and scenic beauty of the country for walking, hiking, and skiing, give it a strong and robust tourism sector.

Goethe summed up Switzerland eloquently as a combination of 'the colossal and the well-ordered'. You can be sure that your trains will be on time. The tidy precision of Swiss towns is tempered by the majestic splendors of the landscapes that surround them.
Must See Places in Switzerland before die
1.Zurich
2.Bern
3.Geneva
4.Interlaken
5.Zermatt
6.Lucerne
7.Lugano
These places to visit in Switzerland it is hard to list them all. But if you get the chance, here are some of the places that you should not miss. Even if you have to come back (and you will want to, again and again) make an effort to see these beautiful places.
Zurich:
One of the most beautiful cities in Europe, Zürich is a favorite tourist destination. When you visit the city, make sure to take a tour of the Grossmeunster church, a magnificent example of the Romanesque architectural style. Do yourself a favor and walk up the steps up to the top of one of the spires for a breathtaking view of the old city, and Lake Zürich. Speaking of the lake, another thing you must do while in Zürich is take a cruise on Lake Zürich. You have several options in types of boats, and each will give you an unforgettable experience. From Buerkliplatz tours leave every half an hour. I recommend the paddleboat tours myself.
Bern:
Travelling west from Zürich you will reach Bern, the city of clocks. It is imperative that while in Bern you take some time and visit the beautiful clocks such as Zytglogge. You will not be disappointed, especially if you are there to witness the display of marching mechanical figures that begins 4 minutes before the hour. Another thing that Bern is known for is fountains. Take a stroll through the city and visit these intricate pieces of art. If you are interested in wildlife, make sure to visit the Bear Pit near the Nydeggbrucke bridge.

Must see for Much Knowledge






Geneva:
As you reach the western edge of Switzerland you will encounter Geneva. While in this spectacular city, make sure to visit the mausoleum of the Duke of Brunswick. It is one of the most beautifully ornate monuments in Europe and is located on the Quai de Mont Blanc on the Square des Alpes. Although technically in France, Genevan's mountain is a must see for anyone visiting Geneva. Take the Mont Salve cable car to the summit and you will have an unforgettable view awaiting you.
For the romantic in all of us, take a walk out along the Pont des Berges to Ile Rousseau, and have lunch at the pavilion there. If you like the outdoors you might consider taking some time to swim at Les Bains des Paquis. Another little restaurant I enjoy is nearby, the Buvette des Bains. Are you interested in chess, perhaps? Then spend an afternoon at the Parc des Bastions and participate in a live chess tournament on a massive scale.
Interlaken:
As you tour through Switzerland, take a trip to the mountain town of Interlaken. The mountain is the main attraction here, and thousands come to see Jungfraujoch each year. Take the railroad up the mountain for an extraordinary view while you travel, but beware this is the most expensive train ride in Switzerland. When you get on board you will agree it is worth the cost. Inside Jungfraujoch mountain, make sure to visit the Ice Palace, an entire interior structure sculpted of frozen water. Bring a jacket for your tour though, it's very cold! While up on the mountain take the ten minute trek out the Sphinx Observatory and take a tour to see the latest in astronomical observations made in Switzerland. For one of the best views available of the Swiss countryside be sure to visit Schilthorn, a mountain observation area that allows you to see much of the country surrounding it.
Lucerne:
Lucerne is the second-most popular destination for tourists visiting Switzerland. Lucerne itself is surrounded by water, since not only does it sit on Lake Lucerne, but it also is split in two by the River Reuss. All along the river you will find elegant bridges, the most beautiful of which is KapellbrŸcke, the Chapel Bridge. I recommend seeing this spectacular bridge along with your camera, since you will be able to take some great photographs.
Lucerne at its heart is a medieval city, and still retains much of its buildings from that era. Explore the Old Town of Lucerne and you will feel as if you have stepped back in time. My favorite place in Lucerne is the Lowendenkmal, the Sleeping Lion. This monument to Swiss bravery in the service of the French royal family is carved right into the rock face. It is a solemn reminder of those that died protecting King Louis XIV, and isn't far from Hofkirche.
The Hofkirche is considered by some to be the most beautiful renaissance church in Switzerland. Right behind the church is a lovely little neighborhood that looks like it has been plucked out of the Swiss countryside and plopped into the city proper. Before leaving the city make sure to take the walk up the hill to Chateau Gutsch, a recently closed hotel. From the terrace there you will be able to fully view the breathtaking expanse of Lake Lucerne.
Lugano:
The center for the Italian culture in Switzerland, Lugano is a lovely place to sky and sight see. The architecture of the city is reminiscent of Venice or Rome. An excellent example of this is the Piazza Riforma, the center plaza in town. If you go on a Tuesday or a Friday you will able to experience the open air farmer's market as the local farmers sell their produce in the square. The best way to see the city is from the train known as "La freccia rossa." Starting at the Piazza Manzoni this round trip journey takes 40 minutes and circles the entire city, a distance of about ten kilometers. With your ticket you can get on and off the train in order to see the sights in town, or take the trip without stopping. Either way you will have an excellent view of this marvelous city.
For a lovely view of the lake take a stroll through the Parco Civico Villa Ciani planted in the Italian style. The sunniest place in Switzerland is Monte Bre, accessible by a funicular train up the slope. For a lovely view of Lugano I recommend taking the train up to San Salvatore and having lunch with the valley below you. There are several lovely trails for running and hiking in this area as well.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009



The UK may be small, but it's full of a variety of amazing places stretching right from John O'Groats to Lands End, Belfast to St Davids. It has a wealth of history, culture, wildlife and it's own unique eccentricities.
Here are some of the most iconic sights that our small island has to offer. Please feel free to add your own suggestions to the bottom of the lens.
Stonehenge :
Top Place to see in the UK

Stonehenge is a prehistoric stone circle and is believed to have been constructed around 3100BC. No one knows exactly what purpose it served, but it is thought to have been a centre of pagan worship.

The site is managed by English Heritage. The stone circle cannot be accessed during normal opening hours, although they do hold regular Stone Circle Access visits in the early morning and late evening.

Tuesday, April 21, 2009


Thursday, April 16, 2009

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom is one of the beautiful places in the world.It is consisting of Great Britain (England, Wales, and Scotland) and Northern Ireland, is twice the size of New York State. England, in the southeast part of the British Isles, is separated from Scotland on the north by the granite Cheviot Hills; from them the Pennine chain of uplands extends south through the center of England, reaching its highest point in the Lake District in the northwest. To the west along the border of Wales—a land of steep hills and valleys—are the Cambrian Mountains, while the Cotswolds, a range of hills in Gloucestershire, extend into the surrounding shires.
Important rivers flowing into the North Sea are the Thames, Humber, Tees, and Tyne. In the west are the Severn and Wye, which empty into the Bristol Channel and are navigable, as are the Mersey and Ribble.
Government
The United Kingdom is a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, with a queen and a parliament that has two houses: the House of Lords, with 574 life peers, 92 hereditary peers, and 26 bishops; and the House of Commons, which has 651 popularly elected members. Supreme legislative power is vested in parliament, which sits for five years unless dissolved sooner. The House of Lords was stripped of most of its power in 1911, and now its main function is to revise legislation. In Nov. 1999, hundreds of hereditary peers were expelled in an effort to make the body more democratic. The executive power of the Crown is exercised by the cabinet, headed by the prime minister.
History
Stonehenge and other examples of prehistoric culture are all that remain of the earliest inhabitants of Britain. Celtic peoples followed. Roman invasions of the 1st century B.C. brought Britain into contact with continental Europe. When the Roman legions withdrew in the 5th century A.D., Britain fell easy prey to the invading hordes of Angles, Saxons, and Jutes from Scandinavia and the Low Countries. The invasions had little effect on the Celtic peoples of Wales and Scotland. Seven large Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were established, and the original Britons were forced into Wales and Scotland. It was not until the 10th century that the country finally became united under the kings of Wessex. Following the death of Edward the Confessor (1066), a dispute about the succession arose, and William, Duke of Normandy, invaded England, defeating the Saxon king, Harold II, at the Battle of Hastings (1066). The Norman conquest introduced Norman French law and feudalism.

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